Top scam dating sites

and tools vary from traditional attack vectors, which use malicious software and vulnerabilities present in almost all the programs and apps (even in the popular Windows operating systems), to ingenious phishing scams deployed from unexpected regions of the world, where justice can’t easily reach out to catch the eventual perpetrators.According to a from the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), millennials are particularly more vulnerable to online scams than seniors, as shocking as it may seem.Oftentimes, the con artists convince their marks to open bank accounts under the guise of sending or receiving funds.

This potential mate claims to live in another part of the country or to be abroad for business or a military deployment.

But he or she seems smitten and eager to get to know you better, and suggests you move your relationship to a private channel like email or a chat app.

Scammers are using dating sites and apps not only to scout for lovesick men and women before bilking them out of money, but also to recruit ‘money mules’ for laundering funds obtained in illicit activities.

According to a new warning by the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3), the latter flavor of confidence/romance scams commonly involves one of a number of meticulously crafted stories that may ultimately result in the victims unwittingly aiding and abetting a crime.

The “venture” is said to have already attracted a great deal of interest from investors who are willing to fund it, but need a US bank account into which they can send the money.

The story may be spun further, and the scammer will ultimately convince the victim to open the account in their name or register a limited liability company and allow money transfers to flow into the account.

Only losses that emanated from Business Email Compromise (BEC) and Email Account Compromise (EAC) scams were higher last year, according to the IC3’s annual Internet Crime Report (ICR) that we also wrote about recently.

Worse still, it is generally recognized that most victims are too embarrassed to come forward, so the actual losses are expected to be far higher.

The research finds that “40 percent of adults age 20-29 who have reported fraud ended up losing money in a fraud case”.

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